Day 159 : Torridon – Redpoint

I am staying at the lovely Scottish Youth Hostel at Torridon which is in a fantastic location with the friendly Matt and Emily running the place. The place is popular amongst walkers, climbers and cyclists. When I arrived I could hear the stags barking as it were the rutting season. I was to hear plenty of this over the next few days.

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Walk Date :                7th Oct 2015
Mileage :                     14.60 miles                   Total Mileage :          2,497.29 miles
Accommodation :      SYHA, Torridon

I meet Pat outside the Youth Hostel who was taking photographs. She comes up here every year from Hertfordshire with her bicycle. She was lovely to talk to and was in her late 70’s. I hope I can be that active when I get to that age.

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The village of Torridon has quite a big village hall and an excellent General store with a café. I set off walking towards Diabaig where I am going to cross to Redpoint.

I pass Torridon House which sits in a prominent position on the north side of Loch Torridon, built of local red sandstone. Nearby is a little church and a tall Celtic Cross in memory of the Victorian Laird, Duncan Darroch.

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Another hamlet is Inveralligin with a scattering of white houses along the shoreline.and a tiny pier. The old schoolhouse is now home to a Field Centre. I climb over Bealach na Gaoithe which means “Pass of the Winds” with fine views over Loch Torridon and the hills of Glenshieldaig and Applecross Forest.

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Around Loch Diabaigas Airde are scattered white crofthouses. I continue to Lower Diabaig, with it’s collection of cottages and a pier.

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At Diabeg the footpath begins off the side of the road signposted “Gairloch via Craig”. The path is easy to follow crossing some flat stones of rock which maybe slippery in wet conditions. After a knoll at  Craig you drop down to a bothy which is maintained by volunteers of the Mountain Bothy Association. Part of the bothy was closed off because it was unsafe.The bothy at one time used to be Britain’s remotest Youth Hostel.