Day 163 : Aultbea – Laide

Today my walk takes me to the most northerly end of Loch Ewe and down to Laird at Gruinard Bay where we are staying, so I should be able to walk right up to the front door of the caravan. First of all my brother-in-law drops me off where I finished yesterday a couple of miles south of Aultbea.

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Walk Date :                12th Oct 2015
Mileage :                     17.50 miles                   Total Mileage :          2,560.89 miles
Accommodation :      Loch Gruinard Caravan Park, Laird

I follow the road towards Aultbea and I pass a shrine at the side of the road, a sad ending for one young life, RIP. As I descend towards Aultbea I have a great view of Loch Ewe overlooking Dolphins pier, a NATO naval refuelling facility. I’m afraid I did not see any warships refuelling in the loch.

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At Drumchork the road branches off to Aultbea. Opposite is a little distillery, home of Loch Ewe Distillery, the smallest in Scotland. Aultbea is a small fishing village with a harbour at Aird Point, a couple of hotels, craft shop, butchers and a General Store.

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There’s a small naval walk along the coast from Aird Point to some wartime concrete structures with display boards telling the history of the area. I continued on towards Ormiscraig where I passed a Farmstead with a metal scarecrow at the entrance. I’m not sure what his wife thought of it.

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At Mellon Charles I pass the Isle of Ewe Smokehouse and come to a café and Perfume studio. The café was closed but we stopped for our lunch at the table outside with splendid views of the loch.

I follow a track and make my way across the stoney hillside to Slaggan Bay with a lovely sandy beach. It used to be a crofting village but there just remains the gable ends of the home of the last family that lived there.

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There is a good track that takes me to the road into Mellon Udrigle with its white sandy shell beach known as Camas a’Charraig, I do a loop around the headland and meet up with my sister and brother-in-law at the top of Meall Leac an Fhaobhair. We take a few moments to savour the views, take a few photographs and watch the ferry on its way to Stornaway.

We walk back to Mellon Udrigle, what a lovely name, and I continue back to the caravan at Laide